The only truly secure passwords are those that contain grammatical errors

Every time we create a new password to protect our data on the Web the same question always returns: what will be safe? When it comes to financial transactions on the internet and credit cards you need very strong passwords. A recent study shows what must be set in order to prove that 100%. With your passwords you better be careful. Saving them and storing them is not a problem but often those that seem most secure and impregnable in reality are the easiest to find. According to a study done by a group of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, the only truly secure passwords are those that contain grammatical errors. An ungrammatical password would be preferred over a password perfectly composed according to the grammar rules of the base.

Mastercard LCD Screen with password

Mastercard LCD Screen with password

The coordinator of this research team, Ashwini Rao says that everything is based on a question of algorithms: the access keys that protect the correctly spelled password were in fact completely decrypted by the algorithm developed by the researchers. Something that could not occur in the case of passwords written without taking into account the grammar.

Bad grammar means secured passwords

Bad grammar means secured passwords

Therefore, according to what has emerged from this investigation we should avoid writing very long passwords that are likely to be of real sentences and focus instead on the use of short alternate characters between uppercase/lowercase letters and numbers.

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